The human body deserves admiration in the way it ensures a smooth barfing experience for you.
The human body deserves admiration in the way it ensures a smooth barfing experience for you.(Photo: iStockphoto)
  • 1. When Nausea First Hits
  • 2. After a Threat is Detected
  • 3. How are the Various Threats Detected?
  • 4. A Little Something About Motion Sickness
  • 5. Emetophobia: Scared of Throwing-up? Yes, It's a Thing
This is How Your Whole Body Comes Together When You Throw Up

Ate something off for your last meal or heading out for a road trip? Just walked into an emotionally stressful situation or simply feeling under the weather? All or any of these situations can lead to nausea. Barfing, throwing up, puking, vomiting, regurgitation - call it whatever you will, it doesn’t make the experience any less unpleasant. However, sometimes, breaking down the process and understanding what really is going on in your body can make you feel better. (Or not, worth a try anyway.)

Nausea doesn’t exist in isolation - it’s often accompanied by sweating, dizziness, stomach ache and a chafed throat. Here’s a look at what’s truly going on when all that you’ve eaten decides to come rushing back.

  • 1. When Nausea First Hits

    The human body deserves admiration in the way it ensures a smooth barfing experience for you.
    The stomach muscles propel the food through the esophagus with great force.
    (Photo: iStockphoto)

    Dr Ajay Aggarwal, Director, Internal Medicine, Fortis Hospital, Noida, defines vomiting as a “reflex action”.

    There are two primary reasons for vomiting - central and local. The first one stems in the brain and can be pathological or psychological. The second is linked to infections, acidity and so on.
    Dr Ajay Aggarwal

    When the body realises the presence of a toxic substance or something that needs to be rejected, the first signal is sent to the vomit centre of the brain which in turn sends another signal to the diaphragm and stomach muscles. The stomach muscles propel the food through the esophagus with great force.

    The main triggers for this chain of actions are as follows:

    • Ingestion of a toxic substance
    • Stress hormones in the blood
    • Motion like that of a vehicle or a swing (motion sickness)
    • An upset stomach/indigestion
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