COVID-19 Will Have a Long-Term Impact on Mental, Physical Health

“This pandemic is likely to have profound short- and long-term consequences for physical and mental health.”

Published21 May 2020, 11:26 AM IST
Coronavirus
2 min read

The coronavirus pandemic's life-altering effects are likely to result in lasting physical and mental health consequences for several people, warn researchers.

For the findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the research team studied low-income women from New Orleans in the US, who were surveyed the year prior to, and at intervals after Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005.

The women reported a range of traumatic experiences during Katrina, many of which are similar to those now occurring during the pandemic, including bereavement, lack of access to medical care and scarcity of medications.

The research showed that at one, four and 12 years after the hurricane, the exposures most strongly associated with post-traumatic stress, psychological distress, general health and physical health symptoms were those most common to the current pandemic.

The pandemic continues to cause widespread death and sickness, as well as job loss and severe economic hardship for many.

"This pandemic is likely to have profound short- and long-term consequences for physical and mental health," said study researcher Sarah Lowe, Assistant Professor at Yale University in the US.

"These impacts are likely to be even larger than what we have seen in previous disasters like Hurricane Katrina, given the distinctive qualities of the pandemic as a disaster," Lowe added.

The study did not include other exposures that are taking place during the pandemic, such as financial losses and unemployment, which are also likely to have additional and significant impacts on public health.

The results suggest that, in addition to promoting actions to reduce COVID-19 transmission and addressing longstanding health disparities contributing to COVID-19 morbidity and mortality, public health measures should also prevent and mitigate exposures that will have indirect effects on mental and physical health.

This includes preventing lapses in medical care and medication access. Additionally, another key exposure in the study was fear for one's own safety and the safety of others.

As such, public health messaging should provide tips for managing anxiety and fear, in addition to promoting efforts to increase safety from COVID-19 transmission.

"Supplemental health services should be provided to those who are bereaved or are experiencing clinically significant fear and anxiety-related the pandemic," Lowe said.

"This study represents a step toward disentangling the health consequences of disasters, while also recognising more longstanding factors that contribute to health disparities," she wrote.

Recently, another study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, revealed that people taken ill by coronavirus infections may experience psychiatric problems while hospitalised and potentially after they recover.

(This story was auto-published from a syndicated feed. No part of the story has been edited by FIT .)

(This story was published from a syndicated feed. Only the headline and picture has been edited by FIT)

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