Mentally Exhausting Work May Increase Risk of Diabetes Among Women: Study
 If you are a woman who finds her work to be mentally tiring then you are at a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, says a new study.
If you are a woman who finds her work to be mentally tiring then you are at a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, says a new study.(Photo: iStockphoto)

Mentally Exhausting Work May Increase Risk of Diabetes Among Women: Study

Does your work drain you mentally? If you are a woman who finds her work to be mentally tiring then you are at a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, says a new study.

The findings of the study, published in the ‘European Journal of Endocrinology’, suggest that mentally exhausting activities such as teaching might be putting woman at the risk of diabetes and employers should be made more aware of the adverse effects of such work.

There are two types of diabetes. Though both involve the body’s inability to process sugar and glucose, they are very different. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the person’s body cannot secrete insulin. Only 10 percent diabetes cases are of type 1, which is usually diagnosed during childhood or adolescence and is managed through daily insulin shots.

Type 2 diabetes on the other hand, is a condition in which the body produces insulin, but can’t process it properly. The early warning signs are hard to spot and sometimes people brush it off as stress and fatigue.

For the study, Dr Guy Fagherazzi and his team from the Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health at Inserm, analysed the effect of mentally tiring work on diabetes incidence in over 70,000 women over a 22 yer period.

Out of the 70,000 women, 75 percent were in the teaching field and 24 percent of them reported that they found their daily work to be mentally exhausting.

The results of the study showed that women who found their work mentally tiring at the beginning of he study were 21 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

The result was independent of the usual risk factors like age, lifestyle, smoking habits, family history etc.

Dr Guy Fagherazzi who lead the study said:

Although we cannot directly determine what increased diabetes risk in these women, our results indicate it is not due to typical Type 2 diabetes risk factors. This finding underscores the importance of considering mental tiredness as a risk factor for diabetes among women. Both mentally tiring work and Type 2 diabetes are increasingly prevalent phenomena. What we do know is that support in the workplace has a stronger impact on work-related stress in women than men. Therefore, greater support for women in stressful work environments could help to prevent chronic conditions such as Type 2 diabetes.

He hopes that this research will help improve lives of millions of diabetes patients.

Also Read : How Type 2 Diabetes Turned My Life Upside Down

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