The reversibility of type 2 diabetes is widely accepted by experts from all around the world.
The reversibility of type 2 diabetes is widely accepted by experts from all around the world.(Photo: iStockphoto/FIT)
  • 1. It All Comes down to Your Choices
  • 2. So Is It Really Reversible?
  • 3. Prevention Is Indeed Better Than Cure: Controlling...
FIT Explains: Can You ‘Reverse’ Your Diabetes?

We all know someone who has diabetes and we have all, at some point or the other, feared ‘could I get it?’

Not just in your genes, you might even find the answer to that question in the mirror.

As the pace of life accelerates, we often tend to neglect our health. Quick fix meals, a lack of exercise and ignoring your body’s warning signs have gifted us the global epidemic of ‘lifestyle diseases’.

One of these lifestyle diseases, that effects over 300 million people worldwide, is Type 2 diabetes.

But its not all bad news and not all hope is lost because if your bad choices caused it, it also means that changing those could reverse it.

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  • 1. It All Comes down to Your Choices

    The reversibility of type 2 diabetes is widely accepted by experts from all around the world.
    (Photo; iStockphoto)

    So what even is Type 2?

    This is the most commonly prevalent type of diabetes. It is usually diagnosed in adults and develops gradually over years.

    90% of those suffering from diabetes have Type 2.

    The symptoms of Type 2 diabetes are very similar to Type 1 except that they don’t arise quite as suddenly and may often go unnoticed.

    Warning signs to look out for:

    • Increased thirst
    • Increased urination
    • Excess hunger
    • Nausea, vomiting
    • Abdominal pain

    Because the onset of the symptoms is slower in this case and easy to overlook, it is important to keep a close eye on your blood glucose levels using a monitor.

    Moreover, Type 2 diabetes is almost always a direct result of poor lifestyle choices such as poor eating habits, a lack of exercise and obesity. With evidence suggesting a strong correlation between obesity and this variety of diabetes.

    Excess calories leads to excess fat in the liver and this in turn makes the liver respond poorly to insulin and produce too much glucose.

    Excess fat in liver may further be passed on to the pancreas, causing insulin producing cells to fail.

    Also Read : How Type 2 Diabetes Turned My Life Upside Down

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