Are You the Drunk Mess At Parties? Blame Your Genes

A sobering thought: ‘drunk and disorderly gene’ identified by scientists

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Health News
3 min read
Scientists link impulsive drinking behaviour with genetic mutation.
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We all have that one friend who can’t hold their drink at the party. If you can’t think of that someone, then it’s definitely you. And if you just can’t say ‘no’ to alcohol, now science has a perfect excuse for your reckless drunk behaviour.

The University of Helsinki has identified a faulty gene which is responsible for people not being able to handle their drinks.

Wild drunks can blame it on dodgy genes. (Photo: Instagram/<a href="http://ltlmspris.tumblr.com/post/36108143166/fuck-the-glasses-just-give-me-the-bottle">LTLMSPRIS</a>)
Wild drunks can blame it on dodgy genes. (Photo: Instagram/LTLMSPRIS)

Here’s Why You Set New Lows of Getting High

Your reputation of not being able to hold your drink might be because you’re suffering from a defective serotonin 2B receptor. The gene, known as CYP2E1, dictates how well you behave under the influence of alcohol.

That’s right, people, if you’re carrying the mutation, not only will you consistently embarrass yourself after one too many drinks, but also be impulsive when sober.

They get into verbal arguments and fights, have unplanned sex, are arrested more often than the healthy controls. 
Dr Roope Tikkanen, Lead Author of the Study
Santa ain’t drunk. Santa’s got a deficient enzyme (Photo: Instagram/<a href="http://moviewhoree.tumblr.com/post/70706886434">MOVIEWHOREE</a>)
Santa ain’t drunk. Santa’s got a deficient enzyme (Photo: Instagram/MOVIEWHOREE)

It’s been a mystery for years why Asians, and Indians in particular, get inebriated from a small amount of alcohol. But now Finnish experts say, they can screen people for this mutation to better understand why this happens and identify a treatment plan.

The discovery may also lead to the development of new drugs. (Anti-boozotics, maybe!)

How Does the ‘Tipsy Gene’ Work?

We get drunk because along with our livers, our brain also metabolises some alcohol. The gene, CYP2E1 tells the brain to break down the booze faster than the liver, that is why people feel drunk even after a peg or two.

Very little is known about the other functions of this gene, but scientists have found that even when people are sober, this dodgy gene makes sure they struggle with self-control and mood swings.

Now Batman has the perfect excuse for these embarrassing moments. (Photo Courtesy: imgflip, altered by The Quint)
Now Batman has the perfect excuse for these embarrassing moments. (Photo Courtesy: imgflip, altered by The Quint)

How Was The Discovery Made?

Finnish scientists tested 200 pairs of siblings with at least one alcoholic parent. All of them were given free drinks (extensively) and after each glass, experts tested their level of sobriety. Elaborate gene testing was carried out and the scientists determined that those with CYP2E1 gene got drunk faster.

Can It Help Curb Alcoholism?

Yeah?! Coming soon, a prescription anti-boozotic at a medical store near you! (Photo: Instagram/<a href="http://chill-girl-from-rus.tumblr.com/post/25715768939">CHILL-GIRL-FROM-RUS</a>)
Yeah?! Coming soon, a prescription anti-boozotic at a medical store near you! (Photo: Instagram/CHILL-GIRL-FROM-RUS)

The scientific community always strongly suspected that alcohol dependence runs in families. Research shows that an alcoholic parent quadruples your risk of becoming alcoholic. But this new finding can be extremely helpful in “protecting” people against alcoholism.

The gene, CYP2E1 makes people less sensitive to booze, so scientists will now focus on developing drugs derived from this gene to help people sober up.

The research was published in the journal Translational Psychiatry.

P.S: How about scientists now focus on finding the evil “always-craving-to-stuff-my-face-with-cakes-and-chocolates” gene, so I can blame genetics for that?

Also Read: Do You Know the Damage Alcohol Does To Your Body?

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