Increasing Belly Fat Leaving Indians Vulnerable to Heart Problems
Indians are more likely to fall prey to heart disease because of their genetic makeup.
Indians are more likely to fall prey to heart disease because of their genetic makeup. (Photo: iStockphoto)

Increasing Belly Fat Leaving Indians Vulnerable to Heart Problems

Indians are more likely to fall prey to heart disease because of their genetic makeup. In lay man’s terms, their bodies are more inclined to store fat than their Caucasian counterparts, especially around their waistlines. This, in turn, is capable of causing several cardiovascular problems.

A Saffola Life study has some disturbing facts to offer when it comes to broadening waistlines and heart disease.

Indians are more likely to fall prey to heart disease because of their genetic makeup.
Indians are more likely to fall prey to heart disease because of their genetic makeup.
(Infographics: Harsh Sahani/FIT)

It further states that long working hours affect the health of 67 percent people in India. Additionally, about 84 percent of Indians who have belly fat, don’t even consider it among the top three reasons of heart problems.

This is interesting because since Indians are already susceptible to increasing belly fat, this leaves them not even more vulnerable, but also more unaware of the harm done to their body.

Also Read : ‘I Had a Heart Attack at 23’: Why Young Indians Are at Risk

Belly Fat=Cardiovascular Problems

Speaking with FIT at an earlier time, Dr Pramod Kumar, director, cardiology, Fortis Hospital Shalimar Bagh, affirmed that though belly fat might not be the factor, it definitely is a significant one when it comes to cardiovascular problems.

This fat isn’t inactive fat. It’s metabolically active fat which is a forerunner of cardiovascular problems. This kind of fat is harmful to anyone across the globe. Indians just simply have a tendency to put it on.
Dr Pramod Kumar

Cardiovascular disease, is the leading cause of death worldwide as well as in India. When it comes to India, more than one quarter of all deaths in 2015 were caused by cardiovascular disease.

It caused more than 2·1 million deaths in India in 2015 at all ages, or more than a quarter of all deaths. At ages 30–69 years, of the 1·3 million cardiovascular deaths, 0·9 million (68·4 percent) were caused by ischaemic heart disease and 0·4 million (28·0 percent) by stroke.

Additionally, those born after 1970 have the highest rate of death due to heart problems caused by narrowing of the arteries, according to a Lancet study.

Also Read : #JustMoveIt For a Healthy Heart: One More Reason to Get Fit

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