Heart Disease, Stroke-Related Deaths on Rise Due to Obesity

Obesity has become a major factor in the slow decline of rising death toll due to cardiovascular diseases

Published05 Aug 2019, 01:27 PM IST
Health News
2 min read

Heart disease and stroke mortality rates have almost stopped declining in many high-income countries and are even increasing in some countries, reveals a new study.

For the study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, researchers from the University of Melbourne analysed trends in cardiovascular disease mortality (which consists mainly of heart diseases and stroke) -- in 23 high-income countries since the year 2000.

The study found that cardiovascular disease mortality rates for people aged 35 to 74 are now barely declining in 12 of the 23 countries.

Cardiovascular disease mortality rates have increased in recent years in US and Canadian females, while in Australia, the UK and New Zealand annual declines in deaths from cardiovascular diseases are now 20 to 50 per cent.

"Research suggests that obesity, or at least poor diet, may have been a significant contributor to the slowdown in the decline of cardiovascular disease deaths," said Alan Lopez, Professor at the University of Melbourne.

“Each of these countries have very high levels of obesity. In Australia, close to one-third of adults are obese”
Lopez

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality -- others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

"Failure to address these issues could confirm the end of the long-term decline in cardiovascular disease deaths and threaten future gains in life expectancy." concluded study's co-author Tim Adair, a researcher at the varsity.

(This story was auto-published from a syndicated feed. No part of the story has been edited by FIT .)

(This story was published from a syndicated feed. Only the headline and picture has been edited by FIT)

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