Remo D’Souza Suffers Heart Attack; Identifying the Early Symptoms

Choreographer and director Remo D’Souza has suffered a heart attack and is currently admitted in the ICU.

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Choreographer and director Remo D’Souza has suffered a heart attack and is currently admitted in the ICU.
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Choreographer and director Remo D’Souza has suffered a heart attack and is currently admitted in the ICU of Mumbai's Kokilaben Hospital, as per a report by The Indian Express.

His wife Lizelle D’Souza told the publication, “It was a blockage. Doctors have done an angiography. Remo is currently in the ICU. Next 24 hours are very important.”

Dr Santosh Shetty CEO and Executive Director, Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital, said in a statement, "Remo D'Souza is being treated by a team of the doctors and is under observation. His condition is stable".

Apart from choreographing a number of hit tracks, the 46-year-old has directed films like Street Dancer 3D, ABCD, ABCD 2 and A Flying Jatt.

Symptoms of Heart Attack You Should Look Out For

Although some heart attacks are sudden and intense, most start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort.

In case of a heart attack, it has been seen that the lack of knowledge often causes a delay in handling the situation, which could aggravate the damage and in some cases prove to be fatal.

So identifying the early symptoms of heart attack is very essential.

Pay attention to your body — and call for help if you feel:

  • Chest discomfort: Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body: Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  • Other signs may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea, lightheadedness, back or jaw pain.

Remember the signs, but even if you're not sure it's a heart attack, act fast and have it checked out.

Can the Young and Healthy Suffer a Heart Attack Too?

According to the Indian Heart Association (IHA), 50 percent of all heart attacks in Indians occur under 50 years of age and 25 percent occur under 40 years of age.

So no, senior citizens are no longer the only faces of heart attacks. Your average person in 20s or 30s is right there giving company.

In fact, heart attack can occur even without a history of cardiac issues and to seemingly healthy people as well. Blockage in arteries can go undetected and may start showing symptoms only when it is at 80-90 percent. 25 percent of people, even after having significant and severe blockages, do not experience any discomfort.

Dr Ashok Seth, Head of Cardiology, Fortis Hospitals, had told FIT in an earlier interview, “Over the last 20 years, we have observed heart disease affect, on an average, 10 years younger people. Nowadays, it’s no surprise for us when people in their 20s or 30s come in with a heart problem. Also, in women, it has grown by 300 percent in the last three decades.”

What Precautions Should You Take?

Yes, Indians are at a higher risk, but it’s not like heart problems are unavoidable. In order to avoid it, we need to adopt a healthy lifestyle. Follow these tips by Dr Ashok Seth to protect yourselves.

  1. Understand the risk factors for heart disease that can be avoided: like smoking, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and high blood pressure and work towards removing them.
  2. Take regular walks. Exercising doesn’t mean body building and excessive workouts. In fact, body building and the supplements you take with it can be harmful. Exercise for heart health means brisk walking for 45 minutes.
  3. Develop a work-life balance and deal with stress. Take time out of your stressful life to spend time with family, for indulging in your hobbies and relaxation.
  4. Get regular check ups for your cardiac health.
  5. Be proactive rather than reactive. Don’t wait for the disease to strike and only then start taking precautions. Develop healthy habits from an early age.

The genetic impact and family history, however, cannot be avoided. Those with a family history of heart disease need to go for frequent health check-ups.

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