Do birth control pills affect your fertility and make it difficult to get pregnant once you stop using it?
Do birth control pills affect your fertility and make it difficult to get pregnant once you stop using it? (Photo: iStock)
  • 1. Is Popping Pills Harming Your Baby-Making Potential?
  • 2. How Long Do You Have to Wait to Get Pregnant After...
  • 3. Could the Pill Benefit Fertility and Boost It?
  • 4. Yes, The Pill Does Have Side Effects
  • 5. What Does The Pill Actually Do?
No, Birth Control Pills Don’t Affect Your Long-Term Fertility

Ladies, our baby-making potential is much talked about. Whether you want to have a baby or not, society places the responsibility of procreation squarely on your shoulders. Want to reproduce? Take care of your fertility. Want to prevent it? Take birth control pills.

So, does one affect the other? Do birth control pills affect your fertility and make it difficult to get pregnant once you stop using it? It’s become an oft-asked question and opinions are divided on it. Especially now, when birth control pills aren’t only used as contraception. Doctors widely prescribe it to young women for various problems, including menstrual ones.

Let’s look at what the facts say.

  • 1. Is Popping Pills Harming Your Baby-Making Potential?

    You spend so many years trying not to get pregnant. So when it’s time to turn all that effort around, it’s natural to wonder what effect all those years of popping birth control pills have had on your body.

    Dr Duru Shah, a leading infertility expert at Gynaec World, and Dr Ranjana Sharma, Senior Consultant, Gynaecology, Apollo Hospitals, say a resounding:

    No.

    And there’s no concrete study yet to contradict them. In fact, several studies support their answer.

    Do birth control pills affect your fertility and make it difficult to get pregnant once you stop using it?
    There are various factors other than having birth control pills that affect fertility.
    (Photo: iStock)

    Then why do so many people say otherwise? Why do so many women narrate their stories of having experienced the adverse effects of birth control on their fertility?

    There are so many factors that affect fertility. How do you know which one could have had an effect on you? Somebody who has been on the pill for 2-3 years and never had children before, and they couldn’t conceive after getting off the pill, they’ll say they couldn’t conceive because of the pill. But she hasn’t tested her fertility anyway. Some people don’t conceive even if they don’t use the pill.
    Dr Ranjana Sharma

    She defends the pill further: “If a woman is on the pill for years and in this time she develops some condition or disease and that prevents her from having children, people still blame the pill for it.”

    Too caught up to read? Listen to the story:

    There also comes the age factor. In an article on parenting.com, Paul Blumenthal, MD, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Johns Hopkins University Medical School, says:

    With a few notable exceptions, immediately after you stop using birth control, your fertility will go right back to what it was destined to be.

    Here, “destined to be” are the imperative words. He doesn’t say that your fertility will be perfect or exactly what it used to be, but it will be what it’s supposed to be at that age and time.

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