Did you know lack of essential nutrients have a direct impact on your moods and mental health? Watch that diet now.
Did you know lack of essential nutrients have a direct impact on your moods and mental health? Watch that diet now.(Photo: iStockphoto)
  • 1. Yes, Psychiatrists Will Check You For Nutritional Deficiency
  • 2. Does Diet Really Affect Our Mood?
  • 3. Why do Some Food Items Make You Happy?
  • 4. What Are the Symptoms of these Deficiencies?
  • 5. Specific Food Items to Include in Your Diet
Did You Know Your Diet Might be Causing Anxiety, Depression?

When approaching a mental health expert, the first round of treatment mostly includes a couple of tests to rule out other medical conditions that might be causing depression, anxiety or related symptoms. The tests involve checking for nutrient deficiencies in the body which could have a direct impact on your mood. From Vitamin D to B-12, lack of all these are held responsible for causing mental health problems.

  • 1. Yes, Psychiatrists Will Check You For Nutritional Deficiency

    Did you know lack of essential nutrients have a direct impact on your moods and mental health? Watch that diet now.
    Yes, psychiatrists will check you for deficiencies.
    (Photo: iStockphoto)

    Dr Bhavna Barmi, Senior Clinical Psychologist at Fortis Escorts, New Delhi, agrees with this and says:

    Yes, it’s true that psychiatrists prescribe some basic deficiency vitamin-related tests. For example, before they can call someone depressed, they will make sure they don’t have a vitamin deficiency (and thyroid problems).

    Manjari Chandra, Consultant, Nutrition at Max Multi Speciality Centre, New Delhi, emphasises this further in the following manner:

    It’s true psychiatrists prescribe some micro-nutrient deficiency supplements when they see a patient is worked up, not able to focus and has lack of concentration and even when they’re suffering from depression or anxiety. 
    Manjari Chandra

    However, she adds, that these prescriptions are only for behavioural problems.

    Food changes are recommended only in mental health cases which are based on behavioural issues, but not for serious neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson, dyslexia, autism and so on.
    Manjari Chandra

    Too caught up to read? Listen to the story here:

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