New Test to Detect Cervical Cancer Has 100% Success Rate
The use of this epigenetics-based test in the clinic would reduce both the number of visits to the doctor and screening appointments.
The use of this epigenetics-based test in the clinic would reduce both the number of visits to the doctor and screening appointments.(Photo: iStockphoto, altered by FIT)

New Test to Detect Cervical Cancer Has 100% Success Rate

A recent research carried out by researchers from Queen Mary University has found a new cervical test that can detect 100 percent of cervical cancers.

Lead researcher Professor Attila Lorincz from Queen Mary’s Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine called it an ‘enormous development.' We are observing Cervical Cancer Prevention Week across the globe.

This is an enormous development. We’re not only astounded by how well this test detects cervical cancer, but it is the first time that anyone has proven the key role of epigenetics in the development of a major solid cancer using data from patients in the clinic. Epigenetic changes are what this cervical cancer test picks up and is exactly why it works so well.
Attila Lorincz

The research, published in the International Journal of Cancer, examined chemical markers that sit on top of the DNA, forming its ‘epigenetic profile’.

As reported in PharmaTimes, current methods of testing, either screening or the pap smear test, only detect up to half of cervical pre-cancers, whereas in the trial led by Queen Mary University of London, all cancers were detected in a group of 15,744 women.

“In contrast to what most researchers and clinicians are saying, we are seeing more and more evidence that it is in fact epigenetics, and not DNA mutations, that drives a whole range of early cancers, including cervical, anal, oropharyngeal, colon, and prostate.”

Further, he added,

We were surprised by how well this new test can detect and predict early cervical cancers years in advance, with 100 per cent of cancers detected, including adenocarcinomas, which is a type of cervical cancer that is very difficult to detect. 

“The new test is much better than anything offered in the UK at present but could take at least five years to be established.”

The use of this epigenetics-based test in the clinic would reduce both the number of visits to the doctor and screening appointments by detecting high grade cervical cancer in its early stages, helping to lessen mounting pressure on the NHS.

Also Read : Cervical Cancer Kills Nearly 200 Women In India Every Day

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