Diabetes Soon to Be Bigger Problem Than TB, HIV, Malaria Combined
Diabetes takes more lives annually than AIDS and breast cancer combined and is the leading cause of heart and kidney failure, amputation and blindness (Photo: iStockphoto/Altered by <b>The Quint</b>)
Diabetes takes more lives annually than AIDS and breast cancer combined and is the leading cause of heart and kidney failure, amputation and blindness (Photo: iStockphoto/Altered by The Quint)

Diabetes Soon to Be Bigger Problem Than TB, HIV, Malaria Combined

(14th November is observed as the World Diabetes Day. The alarming rate of childhood obesity and type 2 diabetes in India has experts worried. Nearly two-third children in Indian cities have abnormal blood sugar levels. The World Health Organisation has described the situation an ‘exploding nightmare’)

With a genetic predisposition brought to the fore by changing lifestyles, deaths due to diabetes increased 50% in India between 2005 and 2015, and is now the seventh most common cause of death in the country, up from the 11th rank in 2005, according to data published by the Global Burden of Disease (GDB).

Ischemic heart disease continues to be the highest cause of death, followed by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, lower respiratory infection, diarrhoeal diseases and tuberculosis.

In 2015, 346,000 people died of diabetes, which caused 3.3% of all deaths that year, with an annual increase of 2.7% from 1990, according to the GDB study.

Nearly 26 people die of diabetes per 100,000 population; diabetes is also one of the top causes of disability and accounts for 2.4% of the disability-adjusted life years lost (sum of years lost due to disability or premature death due to the disease).

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There are 69.1 million people with diabetes in India, the second highest number in the world after China. (Photo Courtesy: IndiaSpend)
There are 69.1 million people with diabetes in India, the second highest number in the world after China. (Photo Courtesy: IndiaSpend)

There are 69.1 million people with diabetes in India, the second highest number in the world after China, which has 109 million people with diabetes. Of these, 36 million cases remain undiagnosed, according to this 2015 Diabetes Atlas released by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Nearly 9% in the age group of 20-79 have diabetes.

The figures are alarming since diabetes is a chronic disease that not only affects the pancreas’ ability to produce insulin, but affects the entire body. Complications caused due to diabetes include heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, vision loss and neuropathy or nerve damage leading to leg amputation.

Unlike other countries, where a majority of people with diabetes are over 60 years old, the prevalence in India is among the 40-59 years age group, affecting the productivity of the population.



There are lots of myths that make it difficult for people to believe some of the hard facts about diabetes (Photo: iStock)
There are lots of myths that make it difficult for people to believe some of the hard facts about diabetes (Photo: iStock)

“Diabetes strikes Indians a decade earlier than the world,” Anoop Misra, Chairman, Fortis Centre of Excellence for Diabetes, Metabolic Diseases and Endocrinology, New Delhi, told IndiaSpend.

“This causes reduced productivity, increased absenteeism in theworking population and gives more time for complications to arise.”

Why the Rise in Diabetes? Blame Genes and Changing Lifestyles

Indians are especially predisposed to diabetes due to social and genetic reasons. The peculiar genetic composition of Indians known as ‘Asian Indian Phenotype’ makes them appear thin but with fat depositions around their internal organs.

It makes them prone to greater abdominal fat, insulin resistance, higher levels of bad fat, and increased chances of suffering from diabetes and coronary artery disease.

Lifestyle changes with reduced physical activity and carbohydrate-rich diets, along with environmental factors, are increasing India’s diabetes burden, IndiaSpend reported in June 2015.

It is estimated that diabetes patients in urban areas spend Rs 10,000 and patients in rural areas spend Rs 6,260 every year on treatment. (Photo: iStockphoto)
It is estimated that diabetes patients in urban areas spend Rs 10,000 and patients in rural areas spend Rs 6,260 every year on treatment. (Photo: iStockphoto)

Cost of Diabetes: Urban Poor Spend 34% of Income on Treatment

It is estimated that diabetes patients in urban areas spend Rs 10,000 and patients in rural areas spend Rs 6,260 every year on treatment, according to a 2013 study published by The Association of Physicians of India.

Since most of the healthcare cost is borne out of pocket in India, those in lower economic groups have to bear the greatest burden.

Urban poor spend as much as 34% while rural poor spend 27% of their income on diabetes treatment, the study found.
90 percent of Indians with type 2 diabetes don’t recognise the symptoms. Early on, the signs can be hard to spot. (Photo: iStockphoto, altered by <b>The Quint</b>)
90 percent of Indians with type 2 diabetes don’t recognise the symptoms. Early on, the signs can be hard to spot. (Photo: iStockphoto, altered by The Quint)

India is predicted to have 123 million diabetes cases aged between 20 and 79 by 2040, according to estimates by IDF.

We need a national campaign on the level of pulse polio to tackle diabetes, it is soon going to be a problem bigger than TB, HIV and malaria together.
Anoop Misra, Chairman, Fortis Centre of Excellence for Diabetes

Even though diabetes features in the National Health Mission’s National Programme for Prevention and Control of Cancer, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke for district-level intervention to prevent non-communicable diseases, it needs to do more to screen, create awareness and monitor and treat the disease to stem the tide.

(Published in an arrangement with IndiaSpend)

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