Let’s Get Real About Pregnancy: Explaining Miscarriage

“There is no fault in you or your husband for more than 95% of women,” says Dr Kapadia.

Updated
Her Health
2 min read

(Get Real About Pregnancy is FIT’s new series where we get the lowdown on the real, honest truth about being pregnant, motherhood, pressures and more. The first part of the series can be found here.)

Video Editor: Abhishek Sharma

Video Producer: Devina Buckshee

We need to talk about miscarriages.

Every time a woman opens up about her story, she is shamed or silenced. Miscarriages are more common than we think but instead of support, women are often mocked for something out of their control.

Dr Munjaal Kapadia, a renowned gynaecologist from Mumbai’s Namaha Hospital, is here to help bust some miscarriage myths.

What is a Miscarriage?

“A miscarriage means loss of a pregnancy,” explains Dr Kapadia. “On average, the world over, about 25 per cent of pregnancies will end in a first-trimester miscarriage.”

“The commonest cause of miscarriages is some sort of chromosomal abnormality that arises in the developing baby. This mostly occurs incidentally. It has nothing to do with the genetics of the mother or father. It’s nature’s mistake.”
Dr Munjaal Kapadia, Gynecologist, Namaha Hospital

Signs to Watch Out For

  • LONG-STANDING CHRONIC DISEASES
  • SEVERE FORM OF HYPERTHYROIDISM
  • UNCONTROLLED BLOOD PRESSURE
  • CONDITIONS THAT CAUSE BLOOD CLOTTING

At-Risk Pregnancies:

  • TWINS OR HIGHER ORDER MULTIPLE GESTATIONS
  • ABNORMAL PLACENTATION
  • EARLY PREGNANCY BLEEDING

Dr Kapadia breaks it down. “Our bodies are attuned to detect a problem before science can. So that is why most miscarriages don't have a discernable cause.”

“There is no fault in you or your husband for more than 95% of women.”
Dr Munjaal Kapadia, Gynecologist, Namaha Hospital

When to Call Your Doctor:

  • BLEEDING
  • SPOTTING
  • ALTERED DISCHARGE

How Do Women Heal? How Can You Treat a Miscarriage?

“If it’s an early pregnancy, and the woman has passed out all the contents of her uterus nothing really needs to be done. You may treat it as a very heavy period and observe for a month till she gets her next period,” says Dr Kapadia.

But if it’s slightly bigger and she hasn’t bled completely or at all but the ultrasound shows the pregnancy is not progressing or the heartbeat has stopped and it is under 7 weeks or so, “then you can use certain medicines to expel whatever pregnancy products are there in her uterus,” he adds.

“Anything above 7 or 8 weeks usually requires a D & C or a DILATION AND CURETTAGE. This is done under sedation and you evacuate the contents of the uterus which is non-growing parts of the pregnancy.”

“If it is only with the medicines, physically it does not take long to heal recovering emotionally or mentally is a different ball game.”
Dr Munjaal Kapadia, Gynecologist, Namaha Hospital

The Mental Toll of a Miscarriage

While the mother goes through the physical trauma, the grief is for both parents. “I ask the couple to look after each other,” adds Dr Kapadia.

Women are trained to attach some form of guilt to the loss, and are often blamed or blame themselves.

“You need to stop blaming yourself, it is not your fault.”
Dr Munjaal Kapadia, Gynecologist, Namaha Hospital

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